Selecting a wood species for your hardwood furniture

by Country View Woodworking Ltd on 2018-11-16 16:20:53

One of the best things about buying handcrafted hardwood furniture is that you often get to choose among several different wood species and numerous stain and finish options. Having options when it comes to wood species and finishes means that you'll be able to customize your furniture to match your personal style, or match existing woodwork or furniture in your home. But if you're not trying to match something in your home, sometimes it can be a challenge to decide on a wood species and finish that you'll be happy with for years to come. In this article, we'll discuss the different wood species options that are popular for hardwood furniture.

Oak

choosing oak species

Oak is a timeless classic for hardwood furniture, and when it comes to both durability and affordability, you really can't beat it. The Oak most commonly used for furniture is Red Oak, which has a very distinct open-grain, swirling pattern that takes stain very evenly. What often comes to mind for many people when they think of Oak furniture is the traditional Oak with a medium-honey-stained appearance. While some desire that look, others may not even consider Oak because they don't realize that Oak can also be stained very dark, or it can be distressed to various degrees to give it a rustic or lived-in appeal.(Photo: Double Pedestal Dining Collection in Two-Tone shown with tops and seats heavily distressed in Oak with 2113 Stain and base, apron & frame shown in Brown Maple with 2660-B Stain).

Brown Maple

choosing brown maple species

Brown Maple is one of the most affordable and versatile wood species to work with for furniture, and it is one of our most popular options. Brown Maple has a tight, fine grain that takes both stain and paint very well—especially dark stains. In fact, when stained darker, Brown Maple can look like a more expensive wood species such as Cherry. Unlike standard Maple that is nearly white in color and more uniform looking, Brown Maple consists of multiple streaks of color ranging from white and creamy white to tan and brown. Because of this variation, the character of Brown Maple appeals to many furniture buyers, since the range in light and dark steaks creates the appearance of depth even after the wood has been stained. (Photo: Salt Creek Live Edge Trestle Table TTTR4272-TR77-BM Shown in Brown Maple with 113 Stain.

Cherry and Rustic Cherry

choosing cherry species

Cherry has a smooth, fine-to-medium closed grain pattern that tends to be wavy or circular in appearance. Unfinished Cherry has rich pink to reddish brown undertones and takes stain evenly. Cherry darkens as it ages, which often adds even more depth to its rich color. While Rustic Cherry comes from the same tree as standard Cherry, furniture made with Rustic Cherry uses boards that have knots and more distinct grain patterns and color variations in them, whereas the boards used for standard Cherry furniture do not. (Photo: Queen Victoria Double Pedestal Dining Room Collection shown in Cherry with 106 Stain).

Quartersawn White Oak

choosing quartersawn white oak species

Quartersawn White Oak differs from Red Oak in that it has a very tight, non-porous grain that makes it water resistant and therefore a desired wood species for ships and outdoor furniture. The appeal of Quartersawn White Oak for indoor furniture is in its durability and also its unique appearance, which is created by the way the Oak trees are sawn at a 90-degree angle and then cut into quarters. This sawing method reveals dramatic flecks and rays throughout the wood, which adds to the character of furniture crafted with Quartersawn White Oak. Like Red Oak, Quartersawn White Oak absorbs a variety of stains evenly. (Photo: 54" Mission Sideboard shown in Quartersawn White Oak).

Elm

choosing elms species

Elm is a durable wood species that offers a very distinguished rippled pattern. Because of the bold pattern, Elm is commonly combined with another wood species in furniture to create a two-toned effect. Furniture created with Elm is bound to make a statement in any home! (Photo: Two-Tone Elm/Brown Maple Dining Room Collection with tops and seats shown in Elm with 113 Stain and frames and legs shown in Brown Maple with 230 Stain).

Still not sure which wood species is best for you? Visit our website, where you can see our selection of wood species and finishes. When you visit your nearest CVW retailer, you'll be able to view samples or wood species and finish options prior to ordering so you can be sure you'll love your new furniture for many years to come!

Selecting a wood species for your hardwood furniture


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